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What happens if the interior secretary decides to revoke national park designations?

Since the Antiquities Act become law back in 1906, presidents have had the power to preserve federal property that's considered of significant historic, cultural or scientific value.

July 10 is the deadline for public comments on the national monument review that President Donald Trump ordered in April.

He's considering rescinding the designation of or reducing the size of more two dozen national monuments created by previous presidents, dating back to 1996.

As soon as President Trump announced the review, New Mexico U.S. Senator Tom Udall tweeted, "The president doesn't have the legal authority to rescind a national monument designation."

Since the Antiquities Act become law back in 1906, presidents have had the power to preserve federal property that's considered of significant historic, cultural or scientific value.

Until now, no president has tried to revoke a national monument proclamation. If President Trump proposes taking away a national monument proclamation, a legal fight will likely follow, but we don't know the outcome because this would be a first-of-its-kind legal case.

Presidents in the past have reduced the size of national monuments, and that’s what Southern New Mexico U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce would like to happen. Pearce believes only the Organ Mountains should get national monument protection, which would reduce its size from nearly 500,000 acres to less than 60,000 acres.

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